Future Proofed: Are Humanities the Answer?

How will technology change the work we do?

 

In a ever-changing world, trying to predict what the future holds is proving harder by the day. The rise of ‘Big Data’, mechanisation and ‘machine-learning’ suggests that whatever the future does become over the next 50 years or so, automation will play a big part in it.

Companies, governments and citizens are increasingly harnessing its powers for innovation and expediency.

So what does this mean for education and the future of work? Can you count on your humanities degree being relevant in 25 years time?

It is hotly debated and no-one can know for sure, but from a purely practical standpoint, here is one reason why any humanities degree will still be needed. Even when it is your car that is driving you to work.

 

Being Human

While research and development in the STEM fields – science, technology, engineering and mathematics, will undoubtedly be important in the future work we do, they cannot do all of the jobs that societies need to thrive.

The clue is in the name: the humanities are, broadly speaking, studies into humankind.

From history, politics, and literature, to art, philosophy, anthropology and sociology – each one of these areas of study and research shed light on how we organise our world and how humans are, in turn, shaped by it.

And while there is overlap between the sciences and humanities in terms of what students learn from those degrees,  (analysis, examination, problem-solving, methodology, and so on), their real-world applications differ.

 

Brave new world

So, as well as honing their writing and debating, humanities graduates have skills that can be applied to problems, such as how we govern a world that is constantly changed by technology.

New moral and political questions like this one will need to be answered as that change occurs.

It seems a reasonable assumption to make that as long as there are humans, the humanities will be needed.

 

Computer Science: Skills to Shape the Future

Image courtesy of Josh Graciano via Flickr (CC 2.0)

Shaping the future

In a world that increasingly relies on computers to run it, the need for graduates with computer science skills has never been greater.

And for those students considering studying in this arena, there’s a world of opportunity out there for them to exploit.

Not only will those skills make a real impact in shaping the world, they are required (and valued!) across a range of sectors and careers. From entrepreneurial start-ups to governments, the demand for these skills goes beyond the traditional fields of years gone by.

 

Growth

And computer science jobs are growing at a far greater rate than other degrees. According to the American Bureau of Labor Statistics, computer science careers will grow by 12 per cent in the decade to 2024. That’s almost double the growth rate for other fields.

So, choosing a computer science degree is a good bet to have a range of options when you enter the world of work.

 

Where to study

In terms of where the best universities are to study computer science, two countries dominate the world university rankings: United Kingdom and United States. The top three of Stanford, MIT and University of Oxford have all produced groundbreaking work in the development of computers, so good English skills are needed to compete at the highest level.

If you’re thinking of joining them, then you’ll need IELTS.

IELTS is the most popular English test for people who want to live, study or work in another country. IELTS is also accepted by more than 3,300 institutions in the U.S, including all Ivy League colleges, and across universities in the UK.

So wherever a computer science degree takes you, the future looks bright.

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