View From Campus: Student Work in the U.S. Part II: After Studies

 

In a previous post we focused on opportunities for international students in F-1 visa status to work while in the United States while they’re studying. In this post we take you through the opportunities they have after they finish their studies.

For some people, knowing how a story ends before they begin reading a book can be an obsession. When it comes to learning what lies ahead for international students after graduation from university in the United States, students and parents are eager to know the ending as well.

By law, after completion of their studies, F-1 students have either 12 months (for non-STEM degrees) or up to 36 months for STEM degrees of Optional Practical Training (OPT) work authorisation possible per degree level for bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral level students. There are 240 different Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) academic degree programs that can qualify international students for the 3 years of work. The challenge is finding the job that makes sense.

 

Where to start?

When starting out the job search Marcelo Barros, founder of The International Advantage, recommends that “savvy international students are not fixated on specific job titles or firms that they may want to work for. Instead, with time on their side, it is preferred that students focus on understanding the various professional fields their careers interests, skills and experiences might be a fit for, and that they may be aware of. It’s all about creating a bigger pool of employment possibilities.”

Also, students who go to sessions on putting together a resume and cover letter that gets sent to prospective employers, are off to a good start. As Nicolle Merrill, founder of GlobalMe School, remarked that cover letters and resumes are “the main tools students use to get an interview with a company. The challenge is that nobody is good at writing (them)…. Even Americans are bad at it.”

 

Making the most of opportunities

On many college campuses each year, there are job fairs and interview days held that can open the door to the right job. However, students should not go into those fairs without proper preparation. Research is a key first step. Knowing which companies are attending and whether they sponsor international students helps a job seeker focus his/her time on those potential employers that may be a good match.

How international students spend their time with company representatives is critical. Students should know how they want to introduce themselves in 30 seconds. Ms. Merrill recommends that international students “practice your professional story. Know what you’re going to tell recruiters when they ask you to tell them about yourself.”

Ms. Merrill has an important suggestion on how to take the next step: “Follow up by connecting with recruiters on LinkedIn and sending them a personal message. You never know where a connection might lead in the future.”

 

Searching for jobs as a non-STEM graduate 

While the majority of international students in the United States are studying in the STEM fields, and have additional time available to them to work, a sizeable number are not STEM students. Barros suggests that these students “should create a competitive profile by creatively strengthening their profile with an eye towards the skills that are in demand by U.S employers.”

Merrill goes further indicating “there will be much more networking and research involved. It also takes longer to find the right role, so students need to plan for a 6-9 month search to see results…. For non-STEM students, I recommend targeting nonprofits or universities.” In addition focusing on higher education institutions, Merrill suggests “students should also target roles in less competitive locations. This means targeting less popular cities and regions such as in the Mid-West and South of the United States.”

In the end, there are no guarantees of employment for international students after graduation, but with extensive planning and preparation, significant initiative and follow-up, and meeting the right company, the opportunities exist. Good luck!

 

View From Campus: Student Work in the U.S. Part I: During Studies

Image courtesy of AliveCampus.com

 

After students arrive on campus at a U.S. college or university, one of the questions they have about their privileges and benefits as an international student involves work. For many of their American classmates, working while at college is very much a part of the day-to-day experience. U.S. students can find employment wherever they want to and can be hired. That is not the case, legally, for international students on an F-1 visa.

 

On-Campus Work

According to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services F-1 students may accept on-campus employment during their first academic year. That on-campus work is limited to 20 hours per week while school is in session, and up to full-time (40 hours/week) during school breaks or vacations.

Many international students, like ones we have profiled on this Opportunities Abroad blog, do take on-campus jobs for a variety of reasons. Madhav now works as a resident adviser, Swati serves as a Global Ambassador for her institution, and Rasana was a graduate assistant in an international office. Oftentimes the work is a good way to help pay for personal expenses students have above and beyond their tuition and fees.

 

Curricular Practical Training

What most students hope to do before they graduate is to get some experience in their intended career field. The regulations governing this type of work for international students, called curricular practical training (CPT), allow for the college’s Designated School Officials (DSOs) to approve either full-time or part-time work for international students off-campus with certain restrictions.

U.S. colleges and universities may have very different definitions of what a required internship or practicum is. Some departments, for example, in engineering, health fields or even education, may have courses that are designated as “coop” or practicum or student teaching programs that students must register for as part of their degree requirements. Others may have a special internship course. Other academic majors may not have any options for CPT for international students, so students should be sure to check with their advisers to see what is possible.These kinds of internships can be invaluable for international students during their time in the United States.

There is a restriction that does limit the amount of authorized CPT a student can work. Students cannot exceed 365 calendar days of CPT approval if the student wants to take advantage of Optional Practical Training (OPT) after completion of their studies. We’ll discuss OPT and other work opportunities in the next The View From Campus post. Stay tuned!

Future Proofed: Are Humanities the Answer?

How will technology change the work we do?

 

In a ever-changing world, trying to predict what the future holds is proving harder by the day. The rise of ‘Big Data’, mechanisation and ‘machine-learning’ suggests that whatever the future does become over the next 50 years or so, automation will play a big part in it.

Companies, governments and citizens are increasingly harnessing its powers for innovation and expediency.

So what does this mean for education and the future of work? Can you count on your humanities degree being relevant in 25 years time?

It is hotly debated and no-one can know for sure, but from a purely practical standpoint, here is one reason why any humanities degree will still be needed. Even when it is your car that is driving you to work.

 

Being Human

While research and development in the STEM fields – science, technology, engineering and mathematics, will undoubtedly be important in the future work we do, they cannot do all of the jobs that societies need to thrive.

The clue is in the name: the humanities are, broadly speaking, studies into humankind.

From history, politics, and literature, to art, philosophy, anthropology and sociology – each one of these areas of study and research shed light on how we organise our world and how humans are, in turn, shaped by it.

And while there is overlap between the sciences and humanities in terms of what students learn from those degrees,  (analysis, examination, problem-solving, methodology, and so on), their real-world applications differ.

 

Brave new world

So, as well as honing their writing and debating, humanities graduates have skills that can be applied to problems, such as how we govern a world that is constantly changed by technology.

New moral and political questions like this one will need to be answered as that change occurs.

It seems a reasonable assumption to make that as long as there are humans, the humanities will be needed.

 

Computer Science: Skills to Shape the Future

Image courtesy of Josh Graciano via Flickr (CC 2.0)

Shaping the future

In a world that increasingly relies on computers to run it, the need for graduates with computer science skills has never been greater.

And for those students considering studying in this arena, there’s a world of opportunity out there for them to exploit.

Not only will those skills make a real impact in shaping the world, they are required (and valued!) across a range of sectors and careers. From entrepreneurial start-ups to governments, the demand for these skills goes beyond the traditional fields of years gone by.

 

Growth

And computer science jobs are growing at a far greater rate than other degrees. According to the American Bureau of Labor Statistics, computer science careers will grow by 12 per cent in the decade to 2024. That’s almost double the growth rate for other fields.

So, choosing a computer science degree is a good bet to have a range of options when you enter the world of work.

 

Where to study

In terms of where the best universities are to study computer science, two countries dominate the world university rankings: United Kingdom and United States. The top three of Stanford, MIT and University of Oxford have all produced groundbreaking work in the development of computers, so good English skills are needed to compete at the highest level.

If you’re thinking of joining them, then you’ll need IELTS.

IELTS is the most popular English test for people who want to live, study or work in another country. IELTS is also accepted by more than 3,300 institutions in the U.S, including all Ivy League colleges, and across universities in the UK.

So wherever a computer science degree takes you, the future looks bright.

View From Campus: Swati from Bangladesh

Swati Roy

 

This month we invited Swati from Bangladesh to give her insights on studying at a U.S. college.

 

Who are you? Name, university, academic degree program, and home country.

My name is Swati Roy. I am an international undergraduate student from Bangladesh at Ohio University, majoring in Accounting and Finance.

 

How would you describe your experience in preparing for and taking the IELTS test

I would describe my experience in preparing for and taking the IELTS test as simple. It is avery simple way to demonstrate your English proficiency since it’s broken down into components and the British Council has plenty of resources to prepare for each. The process was seamless from preparing for the test, taking the test, to submitting my scores through British Council to my university choices.

 

How did you decide on the U.S. as your study destination?

I decided to study in the U.S. because colleges in the U.S. provide a greater flexibility to study what you want. You can explore multiple courses to recognise your passion before you declare your major. And there are various resources to help you with the decision.

 

How has IELTS prepared you for your degree program?

I believe the IELTS prepared me to better understand the content in my college classes because the curriculum is in English. It has also saved me time because I was able to enrol directly into my degree program without having to go through any English learning program or proficiency testing upon arrival. Especially, preparing for the listening and speaking components of the IELTS has also prepared me to effectively communicate with my faculty and peers at the university.

 

Why did you choose Ohio University?

I chose Ohio University because it is one of the best public universities for studying business in the U.S. It provides top notch, student centred learning. In addition to that it has a college culture that is unmatched and an extremely beautiful campus.

 

Describe your role as an international ambassador at your institution?

As an Ohio University Global Ambassador, I work as a liaison between the University and prospective international students. I help answer any questions they have about the admissions process or the university in general. It is always more relatable to them coming from an international student already studying at the University than someone from the administration. I also work along with other Global Ambassadors on different media and outreach efforts to attract more international students to the university and add more diversity to our ever-growing international community at Ohio University.

 

What is most important thing for students considering coming to the U.S. to know about applying to colleges and universities?

I believe the most important thing for students considering coming to the U.S. to know are the specific requirements of a college or university for admission that includes minimum SAT/ACT score, IELTS, minimum GPA, high school transcripts etc.

 

What are your plans after graduation?

Upon graduation, I would love to move to a big city such as Chicago or New York. I would like to work for a multinational consulting firm.

 

 

The Key to Study Success? Don’t Set Goals, Create Habits

Image courtesy of Geraint Otis Warlow via Flicker (CC 2.0)

 

We’re always told that it’s good to dream big. That we should have our goals planned out: write a hit novel, become a surgeon, run a successful business.

 

But as we embark on making those dreams a reality at university and beyond, we can come unstuck. Most people have experienced those difficulties to some extent. The progress to achieving our goals is slow-moving. There are still a lot of blank pages that we’re trying to fill.

 

So, what’s the key to achieving the goals we set ourselves and realising our dreams?

 

Some Psychologists suggest that instead of setting goals, we should create habits.

 

They argue that a goal is too far off in the distance for it to have a significant effect on our daily lives.

A goal doesn’t help you get the thing done. In fact, until you reach the goal you exist in a sort of state of failure, e.g.  ‘I haven’t written a novel yet.’

 

Instead, we should create a habit that fits with the sort of person we are, or want to be.

 

For example, writing that thesis is a daunting prospect, with many thousands of words to compile.  But if you create a habit: ‘I’m the sort of person who writes for an hour every morning,’ the thesis takes care of itself.

 

In both cases (goal or habit), the end result is often the same (these completed). But crucially, our happiness, and therefore our ability to produce our best work, is far greater when we employ habits.

We’re creatures of habit after all.

Why IELTS Is Your Ticket To The World

Image courtesy of i naina _94 via Flickr (CC 2.0)

 

English is spoken at a useful level by a quarter of the world population. That’s over one and a half billion people.

It’s the world’s language of exchange, communication and business – to just a name a few areas. So, to speak English is to open yourself up to a world of opportunities.

If you’re planning to live, work or study using English you will often need to prove your ability to use it.

IELTS (International English Language Testing System) is the world’s most popular English language test. More than 10,000 organisations in 140 countries accept IELTS, including schools, universities, employers, immigration authorities and professional bodies

More than 2.9 million IELTS tests around the world are taken each year.

Taking IELTS opens doors. It can help you live, study and work around the world, including USA, UK, Australia, Canada and New Zealand.

IELTS assesses all of your English skills — reading, writing, listening and speaking, and is designed to reflect how you will use English at study, at work, and at play, in your new life abroad.

Employers and universities want you to be able to use English in the real world, so IELTS is what you will need to prove it.

IELTS is the most widely accepted English language test that uses a one-on-one speaking test to assess your English communication skills. This means that you are assessed by having a real-life conversation with a real person. This is the most effective and natural way of testing your English conversation skills.

Whatever your plans in the world, IELTS will help you achieve them.

How to Get Ahead? Volunteer!

Image courtesy of NewAmericanLeadersProject via Flickr (CC 2.0)

 

The world of work is competitive – that shouldn’t come as a surprise. In many professions or careers there will be many other people applying for the same position as you.

For recent graduates, the odds are against you in one crucial aspect: experience. You’re not likely to have as much as others going for the same job – you haven’t had much of an opportunity to gain experience. But one simple way to overcome that is to offer your time and volunteer.

 

Experience

Qualifications are only one part of what employers will look at when judging how suitable you are for a job. They want to see examples of you working as part of a team, problem solving and showing what you can do. With the time spent in a volunteering role, you will be able to say you’ve had hands-on experience.

It’s also more likely that you will get greater responsibility straight away as a volunteer than you would in a paid role, by assisting the management of a project for example. You can then start filling up that CV with useful skills and experience you wouldn’t otherwise have.

 

Initiative

Volunteering your time in an industry you want to work in shows you have initiative and passion. A prospective employer will appreciate that fact.

Those contacts that you make can often be crucial to you finding a job. You’ll have an advantage over other people by being known to your employer. This is by far the best way to impress and get your foot in the door.

It might also be that not much is being done on what you’re really passionate about.  Perhaps you’re keen to reduce food waste in your area and nothing is being done to tackle it. Real initiative is to do something about it yourself and get all the supermarkets in your area to sign up to a pledge to give left-over food to homeless shelters. You don’t necessarily need to be working for someone else to gain experience, in fact you’ll learn more with a project of your own – the possibilities are endless.

 

Discovery

When you volunteer you can try a variety of work. One week you’ll be asked to work on social media, the next you could be travelling out of the office meeting people and representing the organisation.

Look around for a project that interests you and see what existing charities or organisations are involved with it. Even if your volunteer placement doesn’t match your dream job exactly, you can still benefit from the skills you learn as many will be transferrable. You’re bound to discover something new in what you do, so that can only be worthwhile.

 

Many of our IELTS Awards winners have volunteered in and around university and have gone on to great things!

Besides the obvious benefit of feeling a warm glow from helping others, volunteering can offer concrete experience and chances to develop. Now, over to you!

The View From Campus: Entering Work

 

In this month’s instalment of The View From Campus, Rasana Pradhan, a master’s degree student in environmental safety & health management at University of Findlay, talks about her plans for after graduation.

 

After studying for two years, it’s time for me to graduate. This feeling of leaving behind my friends, professors, supervisors and colleagues tears me up, but life moves on.

 

After I graduate my life will be totally different, I will have to adjust in a new environment with new people – it will be a new beginning. As soon as I graduate, I will have to find a new job. My university has been very supportive and always comes up with different events for international students with job placement opportunities.

 

As international students on F-1 student visas, after completing two semesters of study we can apply for curricular practical training (CPT) and work as full or part-time interns in companies. Once graduated, students can apply for optional practical training (OPT) to be eligible to work in their related field. For students with degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) the OPT session is for a period of 3 years and for others it is 1 year.

 

Findlay has a Center for Career and Professional Development (CCPD) on campus for helping students apply for internships and jobs. This center holds job fairs and professional development workshops providing a platform for the students to find internships and jobs. Many pre-eminent companies come to recruit new employees and many students secure internships and jobs from these fairs. CCPD also organize mock interviews to help student face real interviews in the future. Professional development workshops and these mock interview sessions provide useful tips and train students about finding jobs and facing interviews in the correct way.

 

I truly feel my university helps students find excellent jobs after they graduate. I hope to have positive news soon!

Apps That Make Uni Life Easier (Part 2)

Image courtesy of Ash Kyd via Flickr (CC 2.0)

 

In the previous part, we looked at three applications that can help you find, organise, and store information ‒ Evernote, Google Drive, and Wikipedia. Here are some more.

 

  1. Bookmooch (http://bookmooch.com/)

Bookmooch is an international online community, where you can exchange books you no longer need for ones you would like to own. So, how do you do it? Register for free, give away unwanted books on your virtual shelf to others and earn points, and use those points to get books that are of interest to you.

Although you need to pay for postage when sending out books to others, the free books you get in exchange can save you a great deal of money over time.

 

  1. Delicious (https://del.icio.us/)

Have you ever lost all your bookmarks from your browser due to a virus attack? Well, here’s a simple solution – begin using a social bookmarking website such as Delicious. Apart from making bookmarking easy by allowing users to categorise links, it also lets the user access saved bookmarks from any device with an internet connection.

 

A word of caution – bookmarks on Delicious are generally visible to all users, so you don’t want to be saving pages you don’t want others to view.

 

  1. Viber (https://www.viber.com/en/)

As a foreign student, it’s quite natural to pine for friends and family once you’ve spent a few months away from home. Making international phone calls isn’t always an option, as they can cost a fortune. So, downloading Viber would be a cheaper option. In addition to making calls, you can also send text or picture messages, and all of this is absolutely free.

But what if the person you would like to talk to isn’t on Viber? Easy! Use Viber-out, a service that offers calls to any mobile or landline number at low rates.

 

So, if you are finding campus life stressful, maybe download a few applications that can help you cope.

 

 

GLOSSARY

 

 

give away
Form : phrasal verb
Meaning : to give someone something you no longer need
Example : When Roger retired, he gave away all his tennis racquets to kids in the neighbourhood.

 

postage
Form : noun
Meaning : money paid to send letters / parcels through the post
Example : Does the price of the DVDs on your website include postage?

 

bookmark
Form : noun
Meaning : an electronic way of marking an internet page so that you can find it again quickly
Example : Our web address has changed, so please update you bookmark.

 

pine for (someone)
Form : phrasal verb
Meaning : to miss someone very much
Example : She still pines for her ex-boyfriend.

 

fortune
Form : noun
Meaning : a large amount of money
Example : She spends a small fortune on perfumes every month.

 

cope
Form : verb
Meaning : to manage something well
Example : Timothy finds it difficult to cope with extreme heat.

 

 

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