Little-known Facts about IELTS (Part 3)

An increasingly mobile international workforce is also a factor that has boosted the popularity of IELTS. It is now the most widely used test for visa and citizenship purposes in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

In this final part, we will uncover for you some more interesting facts about the delivery of the IELTS test.

Test security measures

IELTS adopts a multi-layered approach to test security to protect the integrity of test results. To begin with, there are tight regulations surrounding the storage and handling of test material. Tailor-made biometric systems are used at test venues to verify the identity of test takers, right from when they first arrive till they complete the last section of the test. Strict test conditions prevail at test venues to thwart any attempts at copying or collusion. To help identify imposters, detect fraudulent behaviour and prevent cheating, test centre staff undergo intensive training periodically.

Once a test session concludes, routine inspection of test results has to happen before scores can be released.  Test takers receive a Test Report Form (TRF), which is printed on security-enhanced paper and authenticated by an IELTS validation stamp. The TRF also contains a high-resolution photograph of the test taker. Finally, as an additional safeguard against fraudulent documents, a recognising organisation (e.g. college, immigration authority) can verify online the authenticity of every IELTS TRF presented to them. All they need to do is sign up for the free IELTS TRF Verification Service: it will enable them to check if the results they receive match the results on the IELTS database.

Getting help

While the test is in progress, test takers can seek help from test centre staff if the need arises. For example, if you believe you have received the wrong question paper, or if the question paper you have is incomplete or illegible, immediately raise your hand. An invigilator will then approach you and offer assistance. Similarly, if you experience trouble with your headphones during the Listening section, an invigilator will be at hand to sort it out. However, do not expect test centre staff to provide any explanation of the test questions!

So, if you need proof of your competence in English, then look no further than IELTS, the test that more than 11,000 organisations across the globe trust implicitly.

Little-known Facts about IELTS (Part 2)

The internationalisation of higher education in recent times has been a key factor that has driven the demand for IELTS. Given that the test is recognised for entrance to universities and colleges across the English-speaking world, it is the preferred way for most youngsters aspiring to get a foreign education to demonstrate their English proficiency.   

In this blog post, we will talk about some of the measures that make IELTS fair and highly reliable.

Ensuring quality and fairness

Over the years, IELTS has established itself as an assessment tool that is fair to all test takers, whatever their nationality, cultural background, gender or special needs.

For a start, it assesses language skills, not specialist knowledge, so the topics covered are all quite general in nature. The test measures practical communication ability, which means that learning prepared answers by rote will not get test takers anywhere. One of the pluses of IELTS is that it recognises all standard varieties of native-speaker English, such as Australian English, British English and New Zealand English. You can rest assured that your background will in no way affect the outcome of the test.

There are safeguards and systems in place to ensure that the delivery of the test is both consistent and secure. Unique test versions, for instance, are created so that test takers will never sit the same test twice. Furthermore, each test version is subject to routine analysis in order to check whether the performances of test materials, test takers and Examiners are in line with expected standards.

Reliability of test results

Not many people know that all active IELTS Examiners receive periodic feedback on their performance. This task is performed by a team of IELTS Principal Examiners and Assistant Principal Examiners, who second-mark selected Speaking and Writing performances to check assessment quality.  Additionally, if there is a significant difference between a test taker’s scores – for example, a band 5 for Reading and band 8 for Speaking – the IELTS computer system flags it up so that double marking is carried out without fail. Do not miss the final part in this blog post series – among other things, you will get to read about IELTS test security regulations.

Little-known Facts about IELTS (Part 1)

If you are looking to work, live or study in an English-speaking country, then the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) can help you do just that by letting you demonstrate your ability to use English effectively in a variety of real-world contexts. The test is accepted by more than 11,000 employers, universities, schools and immigration bodies, including 3,400 institutions in the USA.

In this blog post series, you will get to discover some little-known facts about the world’s leading language test of English for international migration and higher education.

Getting the perfect score

If you count yourself among those who believe that the perfect IELTS score – i.e. band 9 – is something that only a native English speaker can conjure up, then you are gravely mistaken! The truth of the matter is that native and non-native English speakers have an even chance of producing an IELTS band 9.

In IELTS Speaking, for instance, a native English speaker will get a score lower on pronunciation if their accent has considerable effect on intelligibility. On the other hand, a non-native speaker who is able to use a full range of pronunciation features with precision and subtlety, and who is effortless to understand will get rated a band 9 on this criterion. It’s your skill that matters, nothing else!

Test development

Launched in 1989, IELTS has built its worldwide reputation over the years by undertaking extensive research to provide secure, reliable testing that meets the needs of users across a wide range of sectors. Rigorous test design, development and validation processes are in place to ensure that every version of the test is of a comparable level of difficulty.

For example, did you know that test writers from different English-speaking countries, such as Australia, Canada and the UK, are involved in developing IELTS content so that it reflects real-life situations around the world? To ensure that IELTS is unbiased and fair to all test takers, new test questions are extensively trialled with people from different cultures.

We will reveal more surprising facts about the world’s most popular language test in subsequent parts of this series.

All You Need to Know about IELTS Study Pack (Part 2)

A previous blog post introduced you to British Council’s free IELTS Study Pack and listed advantages you could have by signing up for it. In this part, read about what you can expect to find in the pack and how you can access it.  

Contents

The IELTS Study Pack website is structured into three sections.

  • Webinars

You will find a series of webinars from qualified British Council IELTS experts which cover a wide range of topics across all four IELTS skills. Each webinar focuses on particular aspects of the test and answers common questions that test takers are likely to have. Webinar topics on the website include Introduction to IELTS, IELTS on computer and How to self-study

  • Study plans

This section has tailored self-study plans designed by IELTS experts that make use of a range of online resources to help you prepare for all four skills. To make the most of these study plans, see to it that you use each in tandem with the relevant ‘self-study guide’ webinar.

  • Practice tests

On completing the four self-study programmes, which are a combination of webinars and study plans, do not forget to put your English skills to test and find out just how much progress you have been able to make. Check your exam readiness by trying out either the Academic or General Training test on the website.

For those planning to retake IELTS, the Study Pack now has a brand new section just for you with extra practice materials. Along with six detailed videos from our IELTS experts that give comprehensive guidance to improve your performance in each of the four skills, you will also have access to one extra practice test each for the IELTS Academic and General Training tests.

Accessing IELTS Study Pack

Signing up for IELTS Study Pack is as easy as ABC – all you’ve got to do is visit our official website here and fill out a simple form. You will then receive an email with information to access the Study Pack website.

So, if the Covid-19 pandemic briefly stalled your efforts to study abroad, use IELTS Study Pack to do some self-study online, achieve IELTS success and get your plans back on track. Good luck!

All You Need to Know about IELTS Study Pack (Part 1)

Not so long ago, the Covid-19 pandemic brought parts of the world to a standstill, severely reducing the mobility of international students. In the wake of unprecedented challenges, many youngsters wishing to study overseas had to put their plans on hold. Since then, though, major international education hubs such as the UK, Canada, Australia and the US have reopened their borders to international students, both new and existing. 

If you are among those who have recently revived plans to study abroad and are in a hurry to do IELTS, then the British Council’s IELTS Study Pack could be just what the doctor ordered – it offers extensive guidance to help you prepare on your own.

About IELTS Study Pack

IELTS Study Pack is a unique British Council website created to get test takers prepped with a view to ensuring success on test day. It includes a range of preparation materials and general information about future tests. The materials cover all four sections of the test (Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking) and are suitable for both IELTS Academic and IELTS General Training test takers.

Benefits

When you sign up for IELTS Study Pack, you open up for yourself the opportunity to prepare methodically within a short period and attain IELTS success.

  • Free learning materials in your inbox: The internet is, without doubt, a vast reservoir of IELTS study resources. However, not everything you find on the web is accurate or available for use free of cost. Signing up for the pack will mean having relevant practice materials and information sent straight to your inbox so that you have everything you need to succeed at your fingertips.
  • Chance to check progress: There are practice tests in the pack that can indicate your level of preparedness for IELTS. Once you do the recommended amount of self-study, use the tests to identify areas for improvement. Then, devote more time to improve your performance in those areas.
  • Access to IELTS expertise: Preparation for a high-stakes test like IELTS can sometimes get lonely and worrisome, but you really don’t have to do it all alone. Make full use of British Council’s long-standing experience in delivering language tests by seeking guidance from our panel of IELTS experts.

Do not miss the next part if you would like to know what the IELTS Study Pack contains and how you can access it.

Preparing for IELTS on Computer

IELTS, the world’s most popular English language proficiency test for higher education and migration, can now be taken on a computer.

In this blog post, we will talk about our online resources that can help you get acquainted with the IELTS on computer test.

Find out how it works

The British Council’s Take IELTS website has several video tutorials that will help you understand how computer-delivered testing works. As well as an introductory video that focuses on some general features, the website has tutorials on different sections of the test. You can also find videos that give step-by-step guidance on using various features of the test, such as highlighting text and making notes.

Where to go: https://takeielts.britishcouncil.org/take-ielts/prepare/ielts-on-computer/how-it-works

Access sample test questions

Finding IELTS materials online these days is as easy as falling off a log – there are scores of websites with information, tips and practice tests. Unfortunately, practice tests found on the internet may not contain task types that are similar to the ones used in the actual test, making them unsuitable for test preparation.

You needn’t fret about it, though, as you can access official sample test questions to have an authentic experience of three sections of IELTS on computer – Listening, Reading and Writing. And what is more, you will find sample task types for both IELTS Academic and IELTS General Training.

Where to go: https://takeielts.britishcouncil.org/take-ielts/prepare/ielts-on-computer/practice-tests

Attempt the familiarisation test

What better way to prepare for IELTS than by taking an official mock examination, that too for free? The IELTS on computer familiarisation test lets you do just that! Lasting 2 hours and 30 minutes, just like the real test, it is a full sample version that has the Listening, Reading and Writing sections. On completion, you get results for the Listening and Reading sections too. And as there is no need to book or register beforehand, you can take the familiarisation test at a moment’s notice. 

Where to go: https://takeielts.britishcouncil.org/take-ielts/prepare/ielts-on-computer/familiarisation-test

If you need to take IELTS, opting for computer-delivered testing will certainly be a smart move, as it has increased test availability and faster results turnaround times. Just make sure you find out in advance how your test day will look like.

The Day before your IELTS Test (Part 2)

A previous blog post on the topic focussed on three things you ought to do on the eve of your IELTS test: ensuring your physical well-being, reducing anxiety levels and eating well.

We have some more advice on how to spend the twenty-four hours leading up to your test.

Revise

Whilst it is natural for you to want to continue preparing for D-Day till the last moment, it is important to keep studies light. It is best not to attempt to study anything entirely new on the eve of your IELTS test. Instead, focus your energies on revising whatever you’ve managed to learn up until that point. Besides, do not be tempted to chop and change the strategies that have worked for you thus far. In short, last-minute changes are undesirable.  

Know when to stop

Let’s face it – there is only so much study you can do before a test. Too much cramming for an exam at the eleventh hour isn’t going to help one bit; all it would do is send you into a tizzy. If you’ve put enough hours into improving your language skills, it should give you the confidence to ease up on the day before.

Put together a to-do list

To avoid moments of panic on test day, it might be a good idea to draw up a list of things you have got to do before you set off for the test venue. This should help you remember to pick up essential things, such as your ID document and stationery. Doing a quick double-check of the location of your test venue online is also advisable if you’ve never been there before. 

Get some shut-eye

Months of hard work can quickly go down the drain if you aren’t sufficiently rested and sharp. Remember, getting a good night’s sleep is as important as anything else you could possibly do in preparation for the test. Whatever you do, do not pull an all-nighter, which is bound to leave you groggy and disoriented.

Finally, once you begin the test, you might come across topics that are unfamiliar or questions that look tricky. Just keep calm, take time to slow your breathing, and deal with things as best as you can. Good luck!

The Day before your IELTS Test (Part 1)

When you are due to take a high-stakes test such as IELTS, it is perfectly natural for you to get the jitters, especially on the day before. You may even have to fight hard to block out the thought that every plan you’ve made for the future depends on the outcome of the test you are about to take.

Learning to cope with exam stress is the key to turning in a strong performance on test day. Check out these tips that will help you manage stress and give a good account of yourself.

Focus on your physical well-being

If you need to be able to give your best in a test, it is important that you are fighting fit. Too much study can trigger headaches or leave you with tense muscles, among other things. Spending hours in the same position poring over study material isn’t the ideal way to prepare. See to it that you take regular breaks, getting up each time and moving around a bit.

Manage anxiety

Exam preparation can also affect you emotionally, making your feel blue or unusually moody because of the high levels of anxiety you experience. Learning to absorb stress is often half the battle. One thing you should definitely avoid is too much exam talk in the hours leading up to your test. To lift your spirits, do something during the day that will help take your mind off any exam worries and put you in the best frame of mind – for example, listening to music or watching something funny.

Eat right  

Eating a well-balanced diet will boost you energy levels for sure, so include fresh fruit, vegetables, pulses and protein in your meals. While it might be tempting to sip energy drinks when studying, do realise that they can increase nerves. Also, snacking on junk food, such as chocolate or crisps, over the course of the day might get you a sudden burst of energy. However, it is bound to wear off soon, at which point you will begin to feel sluggish.    

In the next part, you will find some more handy tips on how to spend the day before your IELTS test. 

IELTS Academic or IELTS General Training? (Part 2)

Previously we elaborated on how IELTS can open doors for those wanting to study in a foreign country. IELTS Academic is the popular choice when it comes to higher education, whereas courses below degree level may require you to take IELTS General Training. 

Read on to know which IELTS test can help you land a job in an English-speaking country and which one can help you move abroad permanently.

IELTS for work

Getting a good IELTS band score can, without doubt, greatly enhance your work prospects, as it proves to prospective employers that you have enough language skills to work and live comfortably in an English-speaking environment.

Employers from a wide range of sectors, such as healthcare, finance, government, construction, energy, aviation and tourism, require prospective employees to submit an IELTS result. It is up to individual test users to determine the IELTS band scores and test type (Academic or General Training) that best serve their needs.

You will most likely be asked to sit IELTS Academic if you wish to register with a professional body in industries such as nursing, medicine and pharmacy, where English language competence is of critical importance. IELTS General Training, on the other hand, is usually required for vocational training, for example in the construction, hospitality and leisure, and tourism industries.

IELTS for migration

IELTS is accepted as evidence of English language proficiency for migration by several countries, including Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the UK. Remember that each country sets its own IELTS requirement – for instance, the minimum IELTS score for migrating to New Zealand is 6.5, whereas Australia has set the minimum score at 6. The score required may also vary depending on the type of visa you apply for.

Individuals intending to apply for permanent residency in a foreign country most commonly take IELTS General Training. It measures English language proficiency in a practical, everyday context, and the tasks and texts reflect both workplace and social situations.

All in all, IELTS Academic and IELTS General Training are two separate tests designed for two different purposes. While we may have answered some of your questions, it is best to check the entry requirements set by your organisation before deciding which IELTS test to take.

IELTS Academic or IELTS General Training? (Part 1)

IELTS is a test designed to help individuals who are keen on studying, working or living in an English-speaking country.  Globally recognised by more than 11,000 employers, universities, schools and immigration bodies, the IELTS brand has gone from strength to strength since its introduction over three decades ago.

The real-world feel that IELTS offers is something that has helped it earn international acclaim. As a lot of the test content reflects everyday situations, it is easier for test takers to relate to the tasks they receive. Besides, great care is taken to ensure that the test is unbiased and fair to test takers from all backgrounds.

If you are new to the test, you may be confused about whether to sit IELTS Academic or IELTS General Training. All IELTS test takers take the same Listening and Speaking tests, but the Reading and Writing sections differ. Here is some information to help you understand how the tests differ.

IELTS for study

On average, about three million students choose to study outside their country of citizenship each year, with many among them preferring English-speaking countries, such as Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the UK and USA. Universities in these countries welcome foreign students with open arms, provided applicants have the academic credentials and language proficiency to be able to successfully complete the course they have chosen. Some universities in non-English speaking countries also ask applicants to submit IELTS scores if the course is taught in English.

IELTS Academic is suitable for those wishing to pursue higher education in an English-speaking environment. The test reflects aspects of academic language and evaluates whether you are ready to begin studying or training. It can be your passport to international success, enabling you to study at an undergraduate or postgraduate level anywhere in the world. However, if you wish to study or train at below degree level, then IELTS General Training would be appropriate. Whichever IELTS test you take with the British Council, you do get the added benefit of having your results sent to a maximum of five organisations for free. In the next part, you will be able to find out more about how IELTS can help with work or migration.

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