Study Destinations

Four Reasons to Study in Poland (in English)

Mathu

Photo courtesy of Mathangi Jeyakumar

 

An Unconventional Choice

Born in Norway to Indian parents, Mathangi Jeyakumar ‒ or ‘Mathu’ as she’s known among friends and family ‒ had her schooling in two different countries, India and Norway. Having completed her O-level in Norway and a bachelor’s degree in India, she then made an unconventional choice: to do a graduate programme in Management at Kozminski University, Poland – taught in English!

More and more people are taking advantage of degrees in continental Europe taught in English and, like Mathu, open their horizons to new cultures and experiences amongst an international peer group.

 

Why Poland?

 

  1. Over 400 courses in English

Despite Polish remaining the common medium of instruction across the country, more than 400 courses are now taught in English. And the good news for international students is that this number is expanding at a fast rate, thanks to Poland’s growing reputation as a centre of excellence in European education.

 

  1. Expanding community of international students

Poland’s international student population is getting larger and larger with each passing year. Visit one of its top-class medical universities and you are likely to meet students from the USA, UK, Canada, Norway, Sweden, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey, among others. Many arrive as exchange students for a term but are attracted by its rich history, great food, vibrant night-life and picturesque countryside.

 

  1. Inexpensive tuition fees

Compared to many European countries, Polish educational establishments charge a lot less in tuition fees. You can expect to pay somewhere between £1,250 and £2,750 a year, which is a bargain considering that you get to study in a European country. Of course, this figure may vary depending on your choice of institution, type of course, etc. ‒ enrolling at one of Poland’s acclaimed medical universities can cost you over £10,000 per year.

 

  1. Low cost of living

When a  meal can cost you under £3, a loaf of bread is under than fifty pence, and shared accommodation is available for about £100 a month – you know you’ve come to an inexpensive part of Europe. If you are used to the high costs in countries such as the UK and the US, then it’s safe to say that Poland is cheap!

 

For more information about studying abroad and proving your ability in English click here

Powodzenia! (Good luck)

Get off to a Flying Start with a UK Degree

London Eye large

Image courtesy of Gregg Knapp CC. Flickr

Life-changing!

For those people who have gained a degree from one of the United Kingdom’s many colleges or universities, the experience is often life-changing. For international students especially, getting a UK degree can open doors to employment and give you a chance to succeed at the highest level in your chosen field, be it there or back home.

 

Each year, thousands of students from around the world study at UK Higher Education institutions, with a high proportion of them (over 88% international graduates) satisfied with the learning experience.

 

So why are UK degrees in such demand?

 

  1. Quality education: Higher education centres in the UK offer inspirational teaching, first-class facilities and excellent research opportunities. The approach to learning is such that students receive independence to express their creativity and build on their skills. Since colleges and universities are periodically reviewed, maintaining high academic standards is given great importance.

 

  1. International reputation: The United Kingdom is home to some of the most respected educational establishments; some of them – University of Cambridge (#3), University of Oxford (#6), University College London (#7), and Imperial College London (#8) – feature among the world’s top ten universities.

 

  1. Employability: UK-educated graduates are among the most employable – they come out with the skills and abilities that employers look for. Studying on a UK course also helps students improve their English skills; and gives them the opportunity to meet people from every corner of the globe. Many courses also give students the option of spending time in industry to learn essential skills and make connections for the world of work.

 

So, if getting a world-class education and taking the fast-track route to employment are what you’re after, the United Kingdom might be your ideal destination.

Click here to start your journey to a UK degree

 

A Six-Point Strategy for U.S College Applications for International Students

There is often a disappointing answer to the general question: “what does it take to be admitted to a U.S school?” That is: “It depends.” So for students coming from overseas, the process of applying to a U.S college can seem a tough nut to crack. But it doesn’t have to be. Here, we give you a check-list to help navigate the process and reach your goals.

Thomas Abbs (CC Flickr)

Thomas Abbs (CC Flickr)

  1. One size does not fit all

‘What it takes’ depends on the institution, and how much time and effort you’re willing to put into finding the best course to match your goals. Like many countries, the U.S has a Common Application which allows students to apply online to up to 20 of over 500 mostly private colleges and universities. However, many excellent colleges are not part of this service, so it is up to you to cast your net wider to find those colleges that would suit you.

 

  1. Research, research, research

Be sure you do your research and choose the institutions that match your academic ability and aspirations. There’s no substitute for this work and it will give you a better idea of what’s on offer, what’s required and where you will thrive. It will pay off in the long-run.

 

  1. Have you got the grades?

Most colleges have online applications for admissions that students can complete, but each may require a different mix of standardized tests for admissions and English language proficiency. Whether it is the SATs or ACT for measuring academic aptitude, or English proficiency tests like IELTS (accepted by over 3,300 U.S Institutions), each college is free to accept some or none of these tests as part of their application requirements. It’s up to you do find out the specifics (e.g. IELTS band score) in each case.

In short – don’t take anything for granted. You must check, and check again to see that you have all the relevant requirements for the course you’re applying to.

 

  1. It just got personal

Another oddity of U.S. college admissions is that personal statement essays may be required at non-selective institutions too. These essays ask sometimes very basic or direct questions, like:

“Why have you chosen _______ University?”  or…

“What impact do you feel you can have on our college community?”

Other questions tend to be much deeper and harder to discern, like:

“Describe a traumatic time in your life and how that experience has helped define who you are as a person.” Some universities now accept videos answers to essay questions to allow students the opportunity to express their creativity.

In each case, this is your chance to make yourself memorable. It’s a good rule of thumb to put yourself in the reader’s position; if you were reading 1000s of applications, wouldn’t you remember the ones that tell a story?

 

  1. Recommendation letter

Perhaps the most difficult requirement for overseas students applying to U.S. colleges is the dreaded recommendation letter.

In some cultures, to ask a professor or teacher to write a letter of support for application to university could be met with a raised eyebrow or even laughter, but in the U.S. at many selective colleges, these letters are required.

Some universities may even request up to three recommendation letters before your application will be considered!

 

  1. Deadlines

Beyond tests, essays and recommendation letters, each institution sets their own deadlines for receiving applications and other required materials. There are even very different types of deadlines, among them rolling admissions, early decision, early action, regular admissions and others.

 

Our best advice to those considering undergraduate admission in the United States is to narrow your choices of institutions first to a reasonable number that you might apply to (perhaps 6-10), and then be certain to contact each institution’s admissions office and don’t take ‘it depends’ for an answer! It can make all the difference to your future.

 

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