Four Reasons to Study in Poland (in English)

Mathu

Photo courtesy of Mathangi Jeyakumar

 

An Unconventional Choice

Born in Norway to Indian parents, Mathangi Jeyakumar ‒ or ‘Mathu’ as she’s known among friends and family ‒ had her schooling in two different countries, India and Norway. Having completed her O-level in Norway and a bachelor’s degree in India, she then made an unconventional choice: to do a graduate programme in Management at Kozminski University, Poland – taught in English!

More and more people are taking advantage of degrees in continental Europe taught in English and, like Mathu, open their horizons to new cultures and experiences amongst an international peer group.

 

Why Poland?

 

  1. Over 400 courses in English

Despite Polish remaining the common medium of instruction across the country, more than 400 courses are now taught in English. And the good news for international students is that this number is expanding at a fast rate, thanks to Poland’s growing reputation as a centre of excellence in European education.

 

  1. Expanding community of international students

Poland’s international student population is getting larger and larger with each passing year. Visit one of its top-class medical universities and you are likely to meet students from the USA, UK, Canada, Norway, Sweden, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey, among others. Many arrive as exchange students for a term but are attracted by its rich history, great food, vibrant night-life and picturesque countryside.

 

  1. Inexpensive tuition fees

Compared to many European countries, Polish educational establishments charge a lot less in tuition fees. You can expect to pay somewhere between £1,250 and £2,750 a year, which is a bargain considering that you get to study in a European country. Of course, this figure may vary depending on your choice of institution, type of course, etc. ‒ enrolling at one of Poland’s acclaimed medical universities can cost you over £10,000 per year.

 

  1. Low cost of living

When a  meal can cost you under £3, a loaf of bread is under than fifty pence, and shared accommodation is available for about £100 a month – you know you’ve come to an inexpensive part of Europe. If you are used to the high costs in countries such as the UK and the US, then it’s safe to say that Poland is cheap!

 

For more information about studying abroad and proving your ability in English click here

Powodzenia! (Good luck)

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