IELTS reading

IELTS Test Day Advice: Reading (Part 2)

In a previous blog post, we introduced you to some exam tips that can help push your IELTS Reading score up – keeping an eye on the clock, noticing special features, copying words from the reading text, and predicting answers.

In this post, you’ll receive another set of handy reading tips.

5. Watch out for paraphrasing

In the IELTS Reading section, or in any international reading comprehension test for that matter, the grammar structures and vocabulary used to form questions are different to those used to state the same information in the reading passage. This technique is called paraphrasing, i.e. expressing the same meaning of a text but by using different words. If test takers have to be able to find answers, they’ll need to have the skill of spotting paraphrases. For example, if the key word in the question is ‘dangerous’, then the reading text may have a synonym such as ‘hazardous’. Spotting information in paraphrased form is a quick way to find answers.

6. Adhere to the word limit

Whether it is IELTS Listening or Reading, if the question isn’t accompanied by a list of possible options from which the answer can be chosen, instructions generally specify the maximum number of words that the test taker can write as answer. If you’ve been asked to ‘choose NO MORE THAN 3 WORDS from the passage for each answer’, then keep that in mind and see to it that your answer doesn’t exceed the word limit.

7. Don’t be fazed by unfamiliar words

No matter how good your English is, the chances are that you will come across words that you don’t understand during the Reading test. If this happens, there’s no need to be nervous; instead, check if knowing the meaning of such unfamiliar words is essential to finding answers. If they are important, try to deduce meaning from context. Whatever you do, do not panic, as it’ll break your concentration.  

8. Be mindful of grammar and spelling

Bad spelling and incorrect grammar can cost you dear in the Reading section. While writing answers, be sure to carefully copy the spelling of words from the reading text. Similarly, pay attention to your use of singular and plural words, and other grammatical features.

There’s more IELTS Reading advice to follow in our final part in this series.

IELTS Test Day Advice: Reading (Part 1)

Reading is something which many feel is both relaxing and pleasurable. That being said, in an exam setting, completing reading comprehension exercises can be anything but a breeze.
Here are some handy tips to help you do your best in the IELTS Reading test.

1. Be wary of time

In IELTS Reading, test takers have to answer 40 questions within an hour, reading anywhere between 2,150 to 2,750 words and answering a range of question types. Clearly, time is precious so managing it well could make all the difference to achieving the required score. Do not spend too much time on a question or part, as this will stop you from completing the test. IELTS recommends that you spend no more than 20 minutes on each section or passage, so pay heed to it.

2. Notice special features

In an effort to find answers, test takers tend to be so focussed on understanding the text that they pay little attention to special features – bold or italic type, capital letters, figures, tables, diagrams, etc. More often than not, such features hold important clues that can help the reader find answers. It’s also a good idea to notice headings and subheadings because they help test takers orientate themselves to the text. 

3. Take words from the reading text

While some question types in IELTS Reading require test takers to choose the answer from a list of options, others require them to select words or numbers from the reading text as answers. In such cases, instructions make it very clear that test takers are supposed to ‘choose words from the text for each answer’. It’s worth remembering that the format or the order of the words in the text should not be changed.

4. Predict answers

Some question types in the IELTS Reading test have gaps that need to be filled. In order to save time, think of what type of word may fit the gap – for example, if an indefinite article (a, an) appears before the blank, the answer might be a noun, or an adjective followed by a noun. By using this approach, you get a fair idea of what word(s) to look for as the answer.

We’ll be back with more IELTS Reading advice that you’re likely to find helpful on your test day. 

Understanding the IELTS Reading Section

Reading comprehension is a key language ability that determines how much of a text an individual understands when they go through it. Not surprisingly, most language tests assess this skill.

Here’s what you can expect in the IELTS Reading section.

Skills tested

The Reading section in IELTS is designed to test a range of skills that we employ to read various kinds of text and derive meaning. This includes forming a general understanding of a long text, looking for specific details (e.g. a date, figure), identifying the writer’s opinion or attitudes, and following how an argument develops.

Content

In both IELTS tests, Academic and General Training, candidates receive three sections to read, each accompanied by a set of questions. Texts are normally adapted from books, newspapers, magazines, and journals, and tend to be of general interest. So, no specialist knowledge is required to understand them.

One key difference between the two tests is that the IELTS General Training Reading section is simpler, as it focuses mostly on basic survival skills.

Timing

The Reading section in IELTS lasts 60 minutes, and test takers are recommended to spend 20 minutes per section. Unlike IELTS Listening, no extra time is given to transfer answers, so they have to be written directly on to the answer sheet. Managing time can be tricky here, as candidates aren’t really told when to begin or end each section.

Questions

A total of 40 questions need to be answered in the Reading section. A variety of question types is used so that the difficulty level remains uniform across test sessions. Answers tend to be short, with most of them being a word or short phrase. Sometimes, a letter or number will do.

Scores

Each correct answer is worth one mark. A raw score out of 40 is calculated and later converted to the IELTS 9-band scale using a conversion table. Scores are reported in whole (e.g. 6, 7, 8) and half bands (e.g. 6.5, 7.5, 8.5). To score well in IELTS Reading, see to it that you read up on the format and spend enough time understanding the various question types. Good luck!

Improving reading Comprehension (Part 2)

Image courtesy of Sam Greenhalgh via Flickr (cc 2.0)

 

In the previous part, we spoke of how speed reading and deducing meaning can lead to better comprehension. Here are some more techniques for you to try:

 

  1. Improve concentration

Your powers of concentration perhaps affect your ability to understand a piece of text more than anything else, so train yourself to concentrate well over long periods. Are you wondering how? Well, take one small step at a time. To begin with, see if you are able to focus on what you are reading for about 10 to 15 minutes, increasing the reading time as you go along. The ultimate goal should be to form an ability to concentrate on a task for as long as an hour.

 

  1. Widen vocabulary

Unfamiliar vocabulary is often a stumbling block to reading comprehension, so the more words you are able to recognise, the better you understand a text. One way to learn new vocabulary is by maintaining a running list of words you don’t understand; later, you can look them up in a dictionary. Of course, you need to make it a point to use the words too, while speaking or writing, so that they become a part of your active vocabulary.

 

  1. Expand background knowledge

Background knowledge and vocabulary sort of go hand in hand: an individual who doesn’t know much about factories may not understand words such as supply chain, reverse engineering, or lay-off.  Do not panic though, as there are several ways to acquire background knowledge about something – watching TV programmes, reading articles, talking to people with experience, making visits, etc.

 

  1. Read for pleasure

We commonly turn academic activities into a right struggle, not realising that it doesn’t have to be that way! Turn reading into a fun activity by reading for pleasure: read about your favourite movie star or an exotic holiday destination, or read a novel by your favourite author. This will help you truly engage with the text, because you are reading content that you find interesting.

 

Remember, there are no shortcuts to improving your reading ability. Keep at it, and your comprehension will get better with time.

 

 

 

 

GLOSSARY

 

stumbling block (to something)
Form : noun
Meaning : something that stops you from achieving something
Example : Lack of funding is the major stumbling block to completing this project.

 

running
Form : adjective
Meaning : continuous
Example : Stanley has had a running battle with the council over his new garage.

 

make it a point (to do something)
Form : phrase
Meaning : to make sure something happens
Example : Cindy makes it a point to avoid heavy meals while travelling.

 

go hand in hand
Form : phrase
Meaning : to be closely related
Example : It’s a fact that poverty and crime usually go hand in hand.

 

engage (with something)
Form : verb
Meaning : to be fully involved and try to understand something
Example : Young children engage with content that is full of colourful images.

 

keep at (something)
Form : phrasal verb
Meaning : to continue to work on something
Example : He kept at it and finally learnt how to take a free kick.

 

 

Improve Your Reading Comprehension (Part 1)

Image courtesy of Matthias Uhlig via Flickr (CC 2.0)

 

Let’s face it, among all the language skills, reading is perhaps what most people least enjoy, especially if it happens to be an academic text. The reason for this can vary – a wandering mind, narrow vocabulary, or just impatience.

 

However, there are situations where this skill is a must; an exam perhaps being the best example. Almost all popular language tests have a reading component. IELTS, for instance, has a reading module designed to test a wide range of reading skills.

 

So, how do you improve your comprehension if you are not the reading kind? Here are some ways:

 

  1. Use speed reading

Speed reading is the technique of reading a text quickly with the aim of understanding its overall idea. In a reading comprehension test, this skill is priceless, as test takers find themselves in a race against the clock to answer all the questions. When dealing with long passages, the reader often focuses on content words – i.e. words that carry the message, such as nouns, main verbs, adjectives, and adverbs. This way, they save time, allowing them to better focus understanding and answering those questions.

 

  1. Learn to deduce meaning

One thing that slows readers down is unfamiliar vocabulary. Each time they come across a word they don’t recognise, it hinders their reading speed, thereby affecting comprehension too. One way to overcome this problem is to develop the ability to deduce meaning. In other words, form an ability to guess the meaning of a word you don’t know by looking at words surrounding it. Let’s put this technique to test with the help of an example:

 

We drove past hyacinth fields in full bloom, the air filled with their sweet, lingering fragrance.

 

If you don’t recognise the word ‘hyacinth’, focus on words surrounding it – fields, in full bloom, sweet, lingering, and fragrance. From the context, it is clear that hyacinth is something that grows in fields, develops over time, and has a pleasant smell that is long-lasting. If your guess at this point is that it’s a flower, then you are dead right!

 

So, the next time you come across an unfamiliar word, try to deduce its meaning; then look it up in a dictionary to confirm you guessed right.

 

GLOSSARY

 

let’s face it
Form : phrase
Meaning : used to indicate what you are about to say is unpleasant but true
Example : Let’s face it, we both know you shouldn’t be marrying a guy like Jake.

 

wandering
Form : adjective
Meaning : moving aimless from one place to another
Example : Sally fares poorly in studies because of her wandering mind.

 

comprehension
Form : noun
Meaning : an individual’s ability to understand things
Example : Miguel had no comprehension of how difficult it was to raise a child.

 

a race against the clock
Form : phrase
Meaning : a situation when someone has to do something quickly, as they only have a limited amount of time
Example : Rescuing people during floods is always a race against the clock.

 

hinder
Form : verb
Meaning : to make it difficult for someone or something to make progress
Example : A leg injury hindered Roger from playing his best tennis.

 

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