IELTS Reading: Dealing with Difficult Question Types (Part 1)

group reading

The IELTS Reading test, in both Academic and General Training, has 40 questions. A wide range of reading skills are tested using a variety of question types, some of which are much more challenging than others.

 

In this part, we’ll take a closer look at a particular question type that most candidates feel is the hardest – identifying information (True/False/Not Given).

 

Here’s a simplified version of this question type to help us understand how best to deal with it.

 

Reading text

Mr Farrell, a revered professor at the university, walked into the room in a huff that day. Dressed in a pair of dark trousers, light-coloured shirt and red tie, his dapper appearance seemed to be in stark contrast with the foul mood he was in.   

 

Do the following statements agree with the information given in the reading text?

Write:

 

TRUE if the statement agrees with the information given in the text
FALSE if the statement contradicts the information given in the text
NOT GIVEN if there is no information on this

 

  1. The Professor was wearing a black shirt.
  2. The Professor was wearing a blue shirt.
  3. The Professor was wearing a pastel shirt.

 

So what do you think are the answers?

 

Tips to answer

 

Choose TRUE when you find information in the text that agrees with the statement in the question.
Example: 3. The Professor was wearing a pastel shirt.
Explanation: Since pastel shades are pale or light-coloured, it’s safe to conclude that the statement agrees with the text.

 

 

Choose FALSE when you find information in the text that contradicts the statement in the question.
Example: 1. The Professor was wearing a black shirt.
Explanation: Black isn’t a light colour so this statement contradicts the information in the reading text.

 

Choose NOT GIVEN when you don’t have sufficient information to choose either TRUE or FALSE.
Example: 2. The Professor was wearing a blue shirt.
Explanation: The colour blue is available in different hues, both light and dark. There simply isn’t sufficient information in the statement to choose either True or False so the answer is Not Given.

 

 

Remember, statements that are TRUE are the easiest to find; perhaps start with them and then move on to the others.

Discover further reading preparation and tips for the IELTS test here.

 

Happy reading!

 

How IELTS can help you get into Canada

maple leaf

Whether for study or work, Canada is a top destination for international entry. It’s a prosperous, safe and liberal country and the second largest in the world. So, how to go about proving your English level for immigration or study?

 

For study

As far as study is concerned, Canada is a huge draw with over 350,000 international students visiting last year and 95% of them recommending higher education in Canada to prospective students. To follow in their footsteps students will need to show their English level and the best way to do that is to take IELTS. More than 350 organisations across Canada accept IELTS, including University of Toronto and McGill University, Montreal, so you’ll be spoilt for choice of places to study.

 

For immigration

IELTS was the first test to be recognised by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) and Immigration Québec as proof of a person’s English language level for immigration and citizenship programs. There are other government programs for which a proof of English is required such as Express Entry, Citizenship and the Federal Skilled Workers programs.

 

All in all, there is only one real choice for entry to Canada and that is IELTS.

The View From Campus: Five Things to do Before Your Arrival in the U.S.

 

In the third edition of our View From Campus series, we look at five tips international students should follow when preparing for their studies in the U.S.

We spoke to Adina Lav, Assistant Provost for International Enrollment at George Washington University, about her college and the advice she gives new arrivals…

 

  • Describe your institution in five words? Innovative; diverse; ambitious; socially responsible.
  • What is your institution best known for overseas? We are a university with students and faculty members from every state and more than 130 countries. A GW education integrates intellectual discovery, interactive learning and unparalleled access to opportunities in every sector of society. In a city shaping the future, George Washington is a university where faculty and students not only study the world but also work to change it.
  • What are your top academic programs? GW is well known for its majors and research in political science and international affairs. We also have excellent programs in business, engineering, arts and the sciences.
  • What are the top 5 countries represented at your college/How international is your institution? GW has 26,000 students, with nearly 2,400 students from 130 countries, 300 visiting international scholars, and a footprint in more than 80 percent of the countries in the world.  In Fall 2015, China, India, S. Korea, Saudi Arabia, and Canada were the top five countries represented in our student body. 
  • How does your institution use an IELTS result in the admissions process? IELTS is used as an assessment of English language ability: writing, reading, speaking, and listening – in the admissions process. We use it as part of a larger, holistic review to understand a candidate’s chances of success and best fit for GW. 

 

Five Things to do Before Your Arrival in the U.S.

  1. Once students have got their visas to enter the U.S., what is the most important thing you recommend students do next? Students should focus on their arrival timeline. Most universities have a ‘report date’, which is the date by which the student must be on campus. This date may or may not align with the student’s orientation program. If housing is available, I recommend that students plan to arrive no later than two days prior to their orientation program. This gives them time to get into the country, settle in, and fight any impending jet lag before orientation starts.
  2. How soon can students enter the U.S. once they have their visas? Students entering the United States on F1 or J1 visas can typically do so up to 30 days prior to their report date. Students entering early should confirm housing availability or have a temporary, alternative option set up.
  3. Would you recommend any resources in the students’ home countries to help them prepare for their journey to the U.S.? One of the best resources is the US. Department of State’s EducationUSA advising centres in the student’s country. These centres often have in-person or online pre-departure orientations, which offer a wealth of information to students before the leave for the U.S.
  4. How do U.S. colleges assist international students to prepare for their arrival on campus? In addition to assistance throughout the visa process, colleges typically offer their own pre-departure orientations, checklists, and resource guides. Social media is also a wonderful tool to not only get to know the school and community you’re moving to, but to meet other in-coming students as well. Many schools also offer summer send-off celebrations for students and parents through local alumni chapters.
  5. What advice would you give students who are about to get on a plane to the U.S. to begin a degree program? Come into the country with an open mind and a sense of humour. Americans are naturally curious and straight-forward. Be a good ambassador for your community and remember that the U.S. is a very diverse country, with lots of ideas about the outside world, but generally little exposure. Students have the opportunity to represent themselves, their home communities, and eventually their new universities well.

Engineering your Future with an English-taught Degree in Germany

Germany and engineering go hand in hand. Germany has a great tradition of producing all things world-class, whether it’s automobiles or innovations in energy. So, it’s worth considering Germany as a destination for your studies.

But what if you don’t speak German?

Well, many courses are now taught in English and is a reason why Germany is fast becoming an extremely popular choice among international students. Here are three more reasons to consider a degree there:

 

  1. Low tuition fees

Almost all German universities (about 95%) are financed by the government. Since they receive direct funding, they charge low tuition fees, or sometimes no fees, as is the case with public universities. With living expenses (€600 – 800 a month) being the most significant cost, students find German university education quite affordable. To get additional financial support, international students can also apply for grants provided by the German Academic Exchange Service, locally known as Deutsche Akademische Austauschdienst (DAAD).

 

  1. Collaboration with German industries

Historically, there has always been a great deal of collaboration between German universities and industries. Study programmes are generally structured in a way such that students have to spend considerable time – anywhere between 6 to 12 months – working in the industrial environment. While in most countries an internship is considered an added benefit, in Germany this is mandatory – in engineering courses, for example, students need to complete practical experience. Such internships are invaluable, as they enable students to understand everyday working life in Germany, gain work experience and perhaps meet potential employers.

 

  1. Wide variety of courses

The German higher education system offers over 17,000 courses in almost every possible subject you can think of! Be it scientifically oriented studies, practice-oriented courses or even artistic subjects, there’s something for everyone. What’s more, they cover different academic levels too – bachelors, masters, state examinations, and doctorate degrees. Anyone looking to study in Germany is spoilt for choice.

 

In short, if you are looking for an engineering degree that’s cost-effective, unique and practice-oriented, think Germany.

To get proof of your English ability to study on a degree course, take IELTS.

 

GLOSSARY

 

go hand in hand
Form : phrase
Meaning : two things that are closely connected
Example : Success and money usually go hand in hand.

 

collaboration
Form : noun
Meaning : the process of working together with another person or group to produce something
Example : The singer worked in collaboration with local musicians on his new album.

 

internship
Form : noun
Meaning : a temporary job, paid or unpaid,  taken by a student to get practical experience in a job
Example : Luke learnt a lot of useful skills during his internship at the local radio station.

 

 

mandatory
Form : adjective
Meaning : describes something that must be done because of a rule
Example : It’s mandatory to wear a seat belt when an aircraft is taking off or landing.

 

spoilt for choice
Form : phrase
Meaning : confused because there are a lot of good things to choose from
Example : The city had such great restaurants that I was spoilt for choice.

 

cost-effective
Form : adjective
Meaning : describes something that gives the best possible benefits for the sum of money that is spent
Example : They decided to set up the new factory in Asia, as it was more cost-effective.

 

Thinking of Studying in Australia? IELTS is Your Key

 

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Why Australia?

Australia has a number of well-respected degree programmes that international students are flocking to in ever greater numbers.

 

Its higher education system is now the third most popular for international students in the English-speaking world, behind only the USA and UK, and is set to become more popular still.

 

It’s unsurprisingly a popular destination for higher learning, as it has built a reputation for academic excellence and career opportunities. It has seven of the world’s top 100 universities and because it is so remote, it often needs skilled professionals to meet shortages in labour.

 

International students are allowed to work 40 hours each fortnight whilst studying, so many take advantage of that opportunity to get some international workplace experience under their belts, particularly as international employers are increasingly looking for graduates who are comfortable working across borders and cultures.

 

Advance Australia Fair!

Australia is a young country (in relative terms) and full of a mix of peoples from every corner of the globe. In that way, Australia is a great environment for students to learn and develop in an international setting.

 

That internationalism is evident in her major cities too. Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth and Adelaide are excellent places to study and bases from which students can explore this vast and varied continent. From the Barrier Reef to Uluru (Ayer’s Rock), Australia is home to some of nature’s most awesome sights and unique animals, so don’t miss the chance to get out and see them!

 

Why IELTS?

IELTS has long been the world’s gold-standard for proving English language ability for international study and work. And Australia is no different.

IELTS test scores are accepted by top universities for studying in Australia, and over 9,000 institutions worldwide.

An IELTS test score can be the key to securing your place at an Australian institution and start you on the road to an international education.

To check what IELTS score you’re chosen Australian universities ask for search here.

Top Tips to Improve Your IELTS Speaking Score (Part 2)

In the previous part, we spoke of how it is best to avoid memorised answers in the IELTS Speaking test. Here’s another way to be yourself during the interview.

State YOUR opinion, not the examiner’s

 

Bad example

Examiner: Let’s now talk about the role of advertising. Do you think advertising influences what people buy?
Candidate: Hmm… No, I don’t think so!
Examiner: Well, how do we then explain companies spending billions on advertisements?
Candidate: Oh, OK; I guess advertisements do influence people in some ways. Sorry!

 

The Speaking module has three parts:

  1. Introduction and interview (4 – 5 minutes)
  2. Individual long turn (3 – 4 minutes)
  3. Two-way discussion (4 – 5 minutes)

 

The third part gives candidates an opportunity to state their views on abstract topics and justify them. Sadly, some candidates don’t express how they really feel about a topic; instead they agree with whatever the examiner says the whole time!

 

As a candidate, you are assessed on your language, not your ideas or views. All the examiner wants to know is how wide your range of language is, so focus on exhibiting that. If your opinions are different to those of the examiner, feel free to disagree with him/her. Be confident and speak your mind.

 

Good example

Examiner: Let’s now talk about the role of advertising. Do you think advertising influences what people buy?
Candidate: No, I don’t think so!
Examiner: Well, how do we explain companies spending so much money on advertisements?
Candidate: In a highly competitive market, it becomes necessary for companies to promote their products and services. Advertising helps them reach out to billions of people. How else would people notice a particular product or come to know of its existence? But the question here is whether it influences consumer behaviour. Now, I strongly believe that there isn’t enough evidence to ….

 

Remember, always be frank and express your thoughts; do not change your opinion to mirror that of the examiner – just be yourself!

 

 

 

GLOSSARY

 

be yourself
Form : phrase
Meaning : behave or act naturally
Example : Why do you put on an accent, Tom? Have the confidence to be yourself!

 

abstract
Form : adjective
Meaning : describes something based on general ideas, not anything in particular
Example : They spoke about love in abstract terms – for example, is it valued in today’s world?

 

justify
Form : verb
Meaning : to show that something is right, especially when others think it is wrong
Example : It’s difficult to justify paying huge salaries when the company is making a loss.

 

 

 

 

 

exhibit
Form : verb
Meaning : to show something such as a quality or skill
Example : He exhibited his skills during the football match.

 

speak your mind
Form : phrase
Meaning : to honestly say what you think, usually in a direct way
Example : Clara always speaks her mind, which sometimes gets her into trouble. 

 

frank
Form : adjective
Meaning : describes someone who is honest about their opinions
Example : Dan was completely frank about the problems he was facing in his marriage.

 

mirror
Form : verb
Meaning : to match the feelings of someone
Example : He always makes sure his views on office matters mirror those of his boss.

 

 

The View From Campus: Tips for Funding a U.S. Degree

EIU

Photo courtesy of jrmyers (CC licence)

 

Eastern Illinois University

We spoke to William Elliott, Assistant Dean of Graduate & International Admissions at EIU about financing a U.S degree.

 

Describe your institution in 5 words?

Nationally ranked comprehensive Midwestern university

 

What is your institution best known for overseas?

EIU is known primarily for its programs in Technology, Economics and Business Administration

 

What are the top 5 countries represented at your institution after the U.S.?

India, Saudi Arabia, Nepal, South Korea and Nigeria. International enrollment is 373 out of 7990 total enrollment.

 

How does your institution use an IELTS result in the admissions process?

We use IELTS as a part of our suite of language proficiency tests accepted to gauge a non-native speaker’s mastery of English language. It’s our belief that we should be as flexible as possible in acceptance of IELTS and other testing tools so as to allow our students more flexibility in their choice of use and availability.

 

Tips for Funding a U.S. Higher Education

  1. What are the best sources of funding for international students coming to the U.S.?

Most institutions will offer scholarships and graduate assistantships based on a combination of GPA (grade point average), financial need, and/or other factors.

 

Graduate assistantships can be offered in every graduate program as well as non-academic units. Assistantships provide a monthly stipend in exchange for duties performed in research, teaching and service, as well as a tuition waiver scholarship.

 

  1. How should prospective international undergraduate students look at the price of a U.S. higher education?

A student should understand that due to the strong accreditation system in the US, price is not a good indicator as to the quality of education they will receive. It’s possible for a student to be price-conscious and still earn a degree that will not only help them succeed in their career, but also be the equivalent of a higher priced, more “prestigious” university (as long as their school is equally accredited).

 

  1. For postgraduate students, what is the best advice for finding institutional aid?

My best advice would be to be as interactive with the graduate faculty as possible via whatever technological means available. A big part of successful graduate education is to search for a program that is a good academic fit for both student and their faculty.

 

  1. Talk about the role of work in funding an international students’ education in the U.S.?

Students must have their own means of outside funding and/or scholarship and monetary awards and not plan to support themselves with on-campus employment. The best that one might hope for might be to recoup some money from OPT (Optional Practical Training) employment after graduation, but that is not guaranteed.

 

  1. Are there funding sources available for students after their first year of studies, in case they don’t receive any institutional support initially?

In some cases there might be departmental awards or scholarships that come available once a student has proven their academic talent. Again, these should serve more as an unexpected reward for great academic performance, and not as a hopeful source of base funding.

 

We’ll have more interviews with university faculty members in the campus spotlight, so stay tuned.

 

Get off to a Flying Start with a UK Degree

London Eye large

Image courtesy of Gregg Knapp CC. Flickr

Life-changing!

For those people who have gained a degree from one of the United Kingdom’s many colleges or universities, the experience is often life-changing. For international students especially, getting a UK degree can open doors to employment and give you a chance to succeed at the highest level in your chosen field, be it there or back home.

 

Each year, thousands of students from around the world study at UK Higher Education institutions, with a high proportion of them (over 88% international graduates) satisfied with the learning experience.

 

So why are UK degrees in such demand?

 

  1. Quality education: Higher education centres in the UK offer inspirational teaching, first-class facilities and excellent research opportunities. The approach to learning is such that students receive independence to express their creativity and build on their skills. Since colleges and universities are periodically reviewed, maintaining high academic standards is given great importance.

 

  1. International reputation: The United Kingdom is home to some of the most respected educational establishments; some of them – University of Cambridge (#3), University of Oxford (#6), University College London (#7), and Imperial College London (#8) – feature among the world’s top ten universities.

 

  1. Employability: UK-educated graduates are among the most employable – they come out with the skills and abilities that employers look for. Studying on a UK course also helps students improve their English skills; and gives them the opportunity to meet people from every corner of the globe. Many courses also give students the option of spending time in industry to learn essential skills and make connections for the world of work.

 

So, if getting a world-class education and taking the fast-track route to employment are what you’re after, the United Kingdom might be your ideal destination.

Click here to start your journey to a UK degree

 

One Easy Way to Improve Your English Listening Skills

Photo courtesy of Philippe Put (Flickr) www.ineedair.org

 

So Easy A Baby Could Do It! 

As babies, we’re bombarded with sounds that our brains begin to codify almost straightaway. It’s a skill that is in-built and helps us to adapt to real life situations and understand our environment. So, as adults we should approach listening comprehension in the same way, by relating it to real-life experiences.

 

It’s all about context

Babies associate familiar people ‒ such as parents or siblings ‒ with typical situations (e.g. feeding time, bath time, naptime, etc.) and the sound chunks that are frequently produced on these occasions. Listening to repeated utterances of these chunks makes it easier for them to understand the gist of what is being said.

Let’s now take this theory and apply it to language tests.

Consider the IELTS Listening test, which is divided into four parts: the first two focus on informal contexts, whereas the last two are set in more formal situations. Just being familiar with the context can help you predict the sort of language that will be used, which subsequently helps you identify answers.

 

Filling in the gaps

In some language tests, the context of a conversation becomes clear as soon as the instructions are given. In IELTS, for instance, we hear the voiceover set the context at the beginning of each part; for example: “Section 1. You will hear a conversation between a university student and the shop assistant at a book store. First, you have some time to look at questions 1 to 4.”

 

Take a few seconds and think about your own experiences of buying books: What questions did you have? What information did the seller provide? Then, look at the questions and think of the sort of language you are likely to hear when the speakers reveal the required information ‒ i.e. how to get details such as the title of a book, its author’s name, the publisher’s name, its cost, etc.

Here are some ways in which such information can generally be sought:

Title Author Published by Cost
·   What’s it called?

·   What’s the title?

·   We have an international bestseller called …….

·   Who’s it by?

·   Who wrote it?

·   Who’s the writer?

·   Do you mean the one by Prof. Derek ……..? Oh yes, that’s the one!

·   Who’s the publisher?

·   Who’s it published by?

 

·   How much is it?

·   Is it expensive? Not really, it’s only $ ……

·   Is it cheap?

·   What’s the price?

 

Sometimes, anticipating the language for a specific context prepares you to spot answers in conversations.

So the next time you attempt a listening exercise, do what babies do – use situations you know to your advantage.

 

Click here to try this technique on a practice IELTS listening test

 

Good luck!

 

P.S. We’re going to be posting every week on a Thursday. So, come back for more English language tips, experiences and insight into studying abroad.

English tips to survive the Super Bowl

Photo courtesy of Josh Lackey

Photo courtesy of Josh Lackey

If you’re thinking of studying in the USA, you’re in for incredible opportunities, adventure, and first-class teaching. And the more you immerse yourself in the culture, the more rewarding your experience becomes.

For international students, the Super Bowl is an American experience not to be missed. Whether you’re a fan of the sport or not, there’s something for everyone: the spectacle, the halftime show, the commercials, the chilli – it’s all to be savoured.

This Sunday, the New England Patriots take on last year’s winners the Seattle Seahawks, in a bid to lift the biggest prize in American sport.

So to help you get through the game with some idea of what is going on, we compiled a run-down of some of the unique English vocabulary that gridiron (American football) uses.

 

Audible: When the quarterback calls a last-second change to the play. It’s confusing for everyone, so you’re not alone! This has made its way into everyday speech in the USA, used when someone assumes responsibility. “Ok, the boss is away, so I’m calling an audible on this one.”

Blitz: When the defending team goes hell-for-leather to tackle the opposing quarterback. In other words, the big guys try to smash the guy with the ball before he can throw it.

Deflate-gate: The term coined for the conspiracy surrounding the Patriots’ last game, where they were accused of deflating the balls to gain an advantage. Top scientists have been explaining the physics of it to the nation for the past fortnight.

Downs: This is at the heart of the game’s rules. The team with the ball has four attempts (downs) to gain 10 yards, (the TV networks put a yellow line in for you). So, if you hear ‘3rd and 7’ it means it’s their third attempt and have seven yards still to gain. If they’re successful, the whole process starts again. If they’re too far away after three tries, they’ll usually punt (see below) the ball.

End Zone: The areas at either end of the field that are usually coloured and show the teams’ logos. Get the ball in there and you score a Touchdown.

Extra Point: After a touchdown is scored, that team can kick the football through the posts for an extra point.

Face Mask: No, this has nothing to do with beauty treatments. In football it is an illegal move when someone grabs an opposing player’s helmet to stop him. This incurs a penalty.

Fair Catch: When the guy returning a kick puts his hand in the air, he’s saying to the big guys about to tackle him: “Ok, I won’t try to run, just please don’t hurt me!”

Field Goal: A scoring option worth three points – kicking the ball between the yellow posts.

Fumble: When a player who has complete control of the ball drops it. There’s then a mad scramble for the ball, with everyone piling on top of each other.

Going for Two: Rather than kicking an ‘extra point’ after a touchdown, you can opt to run or pass into the end zone from the two yard line. The riskier option for sure, but worth two points.

Hail Mary: Desperate times call for desperate measures. A Hail Mary is when a quarterback throws the ball towards the end zone in the last seconds of the half or game, praying a teammate will catch it and win the game. When this works everyone goes berserk.

Interception: When the quarterback’s throw is caught by a player on the other team. This is about the worst thing that can happen for a quarterback.

Line of Scrimmage: The line where the ball was stopped. This is where the two teams face each other.

Pick Six: Ok, this is the worst thing that can happen for a quarterback. It’s when he throws an interception and the ball is returned by a defending player for a touchdown.

Pocket: The little space that the big guys make for their quarterback. From here he can look for the best passes up field.

Punt: A kick to the opposing team on 4th down

Quarterback: If you don’t know who this is by now, you’re better off just concentrating on the chilli and chicken wings.

Sack: When the quarterback is tackled behind the line of scrimmage. The tacklers often go for a little dance afterwards to show people how happy they are.

Snap: The start of the play when the ball is passed back to the quarter back (through the big guy’s legs).

Touchback: When a punt or kickoff is caught in the end zone.

Touchdown:  When a player takes or catches the ball in an opponent’s end zone, scoring six points. Then begins the excessive celebrations and choreographed dancing.

Unnecessary Roughness: It seems that roughness is allowed, but only where necessary. Otherwise, you’ll be penalised.

An all-nighter: If you’re one of the millions of people around the world staying up late to tune in to the big game you’ll be doing what’s called ‘an all-nighter.’ This is colloquial term which most students become familiar with at some point.

 

Enjoy the game! And follow @TakeIELTS1 for more tips on using English abroad. 

If you’re thinking of studying in the USA, and need an English test, click here.

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