student visa

Advice on the U.S. Student Visa Interview

Image courtesy of xiquinhosilva via Flickr (CC 2.0)

Richa Bhasin, a former EducationUSA Adviser based in India now works in the Public Affairs Section at the U.S. Consulate in Sydney, Australia. Richa shares her experience working with prospective students as they prepare for the student visa interview.

 

What is one word you would use to describe the U.S. Student Visa Process?

Straightforward

 

What is the I-20/DS-2019 form that a student receives after they have been admitted and documented funding?

Form I-20 is a document issued to accepted students by Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP)-certified schools that indicates a student’s primary purpose for coming to the United States.

Form DS-2019 allows a J exchange visitor to apply for a visa. It identifies the exchange visitor and the designated sponsor and provides a brief description of the exchange visitor’s program, including the start and end date, category of exchange and an estimate of the cost of the exchange program.

 

What is the SEVIS fee students must pay?

SEVIS stands for Student and Exchange Visitor Information System.

SEVIS is an Internet-based system that maintains data on foreign students and exchange visitors, as well as their dependents, before and during your stay in the US. If you apply for a student or exchange visitor visa, in most cases you must pay the SEVIS fee.

 

How soon can a student apply for a student visa after receiving the I-20/DS-2019 form?

You can apply for a visa no more than 120 days before the start of your program and can travel no more than 30 days before the start of your program.

 

Are there any in-country resources students can consult about the student visa process?

Students are encouraged to reach out to the EducationUSA network in their countries. The advisers are highly knowledgeable about the process and guide students for the visa application process. Here is where you can find the closest center – https://educationusa.state.gov/

 

What advice would you give to students who are nervous about their student visa interview?

This is the key thing all the students should be aware of – Under U.S. law, people who apply for non-immigrant visas are viewed as “intending immigrants” (who want to live permanently in the U.S.) until they can convince the consular officer that they are not. You must, therefore, be able to show that you have reasons for returning to your “residence abroad” (usually in your home country) that are stronger than reasons for remaining in the United States and that you intend to depart the United States at the conclusion of your studies.

Hence, the consular officer needs to know your specific objectives, both academic and professional, for studying in the United States. Be prepared to explain why it is better to study your specific field in the United States than to study at home. Be ready to say exactly what you will study and for what career your U.S. studies will prepare you. Calmly state your education plans concisely and clearly.

 

 

The View From Campus: 10 US Student Visa Tips

Image courtesy of Robert Couse-Baker via Flickr (CC 2.0)

Everyone has heard a story (or two) of a friend, or friend of a friend, who has been denied a student visa to study in the U.S., right? Well, the truth is, that over the last five years, the global average of students being approved for a U.S. student visa (F-1) has been over 80 percent.

The good news is with the right preparation, honest answers, and appropriate documentation you can give yourself an excellent chance of being granted a student visa.

 

Here are the ten steps you will need to take:
10. Got your I-20? Make sure you have received the I-20 & admission letter from the college/university you plan to attend. You may have been accepted and received I-20s from more than one school. We recommend that you make a decision as to which institution you will attend before starting the visa process.

9. Check your passport:
• Make sure your passport will be valid for at least six months after your initial planned entry into the U.S.
• Is your name spelled the same (and in the same order) as is listed on your passport? It has to be!

8. Pay your SEVIS fee. Students can pay this fee online. You will need an e-receipt for next steps in the process.

7. Complete the Visa Application Form online DS-160 (non-immigrant visa application). You will need most of the following items to complete this form:
• Passport
• SEVIS ID (from your I-20 form)
• Address of the college you will attend (usually on the I-20)
• Travel itinerary to the U.S. if you have made arrangements already
• Admission letter from the college you will attend
• Proof of funding – bank statements, scholarship award letters, etc.
• Dates of your last five visits to the United States (if any)

6. Plan ahead! You can schedule your visa appointment up to 120 days in advance of the start date listed on your I-20 (when your new school requires you to be on campus).

5. Schedule your visa appointment at the U.S. embassy/consulate nearest you. You will also need to pay the visa application fee (approximately $160, price varies slightly per country).

4. Attend a Visa Session at an EducationUSA Advising Center in your country. At these sessions they will make it clear what they are expecting from successful student visa applicants, and the kind of questions they will ask.

3. Enjoy the experience. A couple years ago our friends at the U.S. Embassy in London put together a great video to help ease your fears, Mission: Possible – Get Your U.S. Student Visa.

2. Talk to your friends. Are any of your former classmates studying in the U.S. now? Ask their advice about their interview experiences and ask for their recommendations.

1. Breathe, relax, and be honest. You have invested a lot of time, energy, and resources to get to this visa interview. Try not to be too nervous. You are almost there.

 

Good luck to you as you take this important next step!

 

The View From Campus: the low-down on U.S. student visas

We quizzed Martin A. Bennett, Director, International Admissions & Services, University of Findlay, Ohio about the ins and outs of getting a U.S student visa and what makes UF tick…

  • Describe your institution in 5 words? Innovative, Safe, Friendly, Affordable, Meaningful
  • What is your institution best known for overseas? Having a strong international community.
  • What are your top academic programs? Undergraduate: computer science, business, equestrian studies, animal science, nuclear medical technology.  For  Graduate:  MBA, environmental safety & occupational health management, TESOL, applied security & analytics, health informatics.
  • What are the top 5 countries represented at your college/How international is your institution? Saudi Arabia, India, Nepal, China, Japan; 15% international
  • How does your institution use an IELTS result in the admissions process? We accept IELTS for both undergraduate and graduate studies. Generally, a 6.0 allows a student direct entry in an undergraduate academic program, while for each graduate program the minimum scores range from a 6.5 to an 8.0 on the IELTS test.

 

Student Visas for the U.S. – Your questions answered

 

  • What is the I-20/DS-2019 form that a student receives after they have been admitted and documented funding? The I-20 or DS-2019 form is a non-immigrant document produced by the college that students are admitted to that is used to apply for an F-1 or J-1 student visa (respectively).
  • How soon can a student apply for a student visa after receiving the I-20/DS-2019 form? Students can apply for a student visa no more than 120 days before the program start date listed on their I-20/DS-2019.
  • What is the SEVIS fee students have to pay? The SEVIS fee is an administrative fee charged by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security which helps to maintain the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS). Students must pay this fee before they can apply for their student visa interview at the U.S. consulate/embassy.
  • What advice would you give to students who are nervous about their student visa interview? Prepare by having all the right documents (I-20, admission letters, proof of funding, test scores, etc.); Relax; Dress appropriately; Be honest; Be yourself! Good luck!

Pin It on Pinterest